Redshift ups and downs

AWS Redshift has been popular lately around my current gig. We’ve got a couple of clusters in use and a few more in POC mode. The in-use clusters are easy to justify pre-paid instances. A few thousand dollars and you have a cluster; not bad.

The cost of POC’s is a little more difficult, so we do what we can to keep them off-line when not in use. Fortunately, the AWS CLI makes this fairly trivial. I have a couple of short scripts that I have cron’d for daily (M-F) execution.

First we need to stop the cluster w/ a Snapshot:


CLUSTERID=Your-Clustername
TS=$(date +"%Y%m%d-%H%M%S")
echo $TS > ${CLUSTERID}_ss.ts
SNAPID=autosnap-$CLUSTERID
aws redshift delete-cluster --cluster-identifier $CLUSTERID --final-cluster-snapshot-identifier ${SNAPID}-$TS


All we’re doing is creating a unique snapshot name that we can store and use to create a new cluster from. Timestamps are a favorite tool of mine for doing this.

And in the morning we create a new cluster based on the snapshot:


CLUSTERID=Your-Clustername
TS=$(cat ${CLUSTERID}_ss.ts)
SNAPID=autosnap-$CLUSTERID
aws redshift restore-from-cluster-snapshot --cluster-identifier $CLUSTERID --snapshot-identifier ${SNAPID}-$TS


In this script we Read TS from the file we created on shutdown and use that (the latest) snapshot to start our cluster.

Cron these scripts for daily execution and Profit! 🙂


Grease Monkey ~~ GM

About Grease Monkey

Computer nerd since the 80's. Data nerd since the 90's. Generic nerd for a lifetime.
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